All tagged fee-only

Study Shows Delaying Retirement May Increase Longevity, Especially for Men

In October, the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College published a research paper showing how policies in the Netherlands that delay retirement can increase longevity, especially for men. The working paper, “How Does Delayed Retirement Affect Mortality and Health?” was written by research economists Alice Zulkarnain and Matthew S. Rutledge. The authors observed that older Americans have been retiring later for a number of reasons, including because work is becoming less physically demanding, employers have shifted from defined benefit to defined contribution pensions, and Social Security’s incentives are changing. The researchers cautioned, however, that understanding the implications of working longer for mortality and health is complicated, because people who are healthier tend to work longer than people who are less healthy.

Taking advantage of a natural experiment in which a policy was implemented in the Netherlands that incentivized a broad cohort of early baby boomers in their sixties to delay retirement, the study used Dutch administrative data to explore the links between work and health outcomes related to depression and diabetes, applying an instrumental variable approach that took into account the joint relationship between work and mortality.

The findings showed that delayed retirement reduced the five-year mortality rate for men ages 62-65 by 2.4 percentage points, which represents a 32% reduction relative to the five-year mortality rate for non-working men of the same age. For women, the results were inconclusive.

Moreover, the study found no significant relationship between delayed retirement and health conditions like diabetes or depression, which suggests that these conditions were not responsible for the mortality reduction. The researchers speculated that this could be because depression and diabetes are not as acutely life-threatening as some other conditions, adding that further research is needed to identify the conditions through which the positive effect of working on mortality manifests itself. They also pointed out that the relationship between working and mortality could manifest itself through a variety of conditions, which may make it difficult to find a significant result for any one condition.

In some ways, the U.S. already has a delayed retirement incentive with the Social Security benefits program. That’s because every year someone delays taking their Social Security benefit beyond their stated full retirement age, they get an 8% annual increase every year until age 70.

From a financial planning standpoint, working longer is one of the main ways someone can exercise control over whether or not they outlive their money. One takeaway I offer, is set yourself up to do work you enjoy. It’s much more likely that you will work longer if you have a sense of fulfillment or enjoyment in the work you do. And, if you begin putting steps in place to transition to work you enjoy now, it’s more likely that you will make the leap successfully when the time comes.  

My mission is to help 80 households be more generous over their lifetime. And that’s it. 

What’s a household? Partly it’s a way for me to measure how many people I’m helping. So it’s a family, a unit, it could be a husband and wife and their kids. Or, it could be an individual whose committed to the process of working together to make wise financial decisions. 

Why just 80 clients? There’s not a lot of science that goes into it for me. It’s a feel but also an understanding of my capacity. I want to give my full attention to my clients when they need it. I know I can do that with 80. So I’m capping it there. At least, that’s my conviction now.

I also believe there will be enough of a ripple effect with 80 committed clients working together for the next 5, 10, 15, 20+ years, that I’ll have plenty of reasons to feel like I made enough of a difference in enough people’s lives. Plus, it takes a long time to work one-on-one with clients to get clear on their goals, values, and action items. Then, there’s course corrections that happen as life happens. To do quality work, at some point you have to limit the quantity of work. Unless of course you’re building a corporate empire to scale, which I am not.


Why the focus on generosity? Of course there’s more that goes into a financial plan than being generous, but for me, that’s where all roads have to end up if I’m doing my job properly. 

Let’s take retirement, for example. Why do people want to retire. Well, there’s an infinite number of reasons, but there are a few main reasons. For some people it’s to rest, for others it’s to get away, for some it’s to spend time with family, and yet for others it’s to do nothing but their hobbies and passions. My thing is that retirement ought to be more of a change towards something else rather than an end in and of itself. And, I think the way to get it to be a change towards something new, is to have a reason outside of just making yourself more comfortable. Comfort is important, but at some point you max out on comfort. Then what? That’s where generosity comes in. I think we’re more fulfilled when we have an aim that involves giving something to someone else without expecting payback in return. To me, there’s an endless amount of financial planning work to be done in 80 households’ lives to maximize the generosity in each one, and thus the positive impact all around the world.

 Also, I feel that almost no one has anyone in their life challenging them to be more generous, nor teaching them wise financial principles to get to the point where they feel like they have “enough” or even “extra. For the most part, no one talks about their money at all to other people, let alone their closest family or friends. And it would be far too risky to tell someone what you think they should do with their money. So, that where my calling comes in. I’m not telling people what to do with their money, rather coming along side to provide a personal financial framework for you how and what to do to get the most out of what you have. 

Helping Your Heirs While Helping Others via the Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT) #giving

Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT)

A charitable remainder trust (CRT) can be a highly effective financial and estate planning tool. The CRT can allow you to: avoid capital gains taxes on highly appreciated assets, however when income is distributed to the income beneficiaries it is taxable; receive an income stream based on the full, fair market value (FMV) of those assets; receive an immediate charitable deduction; and ultimately benefit the charity(ies) of your choice.

What is a blockchain token? #cryptocurrency #bitcoin

People are just becoming acquainted with the idea of digital money in the form of cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, where transactions are recorded on a secure distributed database called a blockchain. And now along comes a new concept: the blockchain-based token, which I’ve been following as a blockchain researcher and teacher of courses about cryptocurrency and blockchain tokens.