All in Tax Planning

Planning Continues Upon Retirement for Business Owners

As a business owner, you have invested a great deal of time and effort into building your company over the years. You know the amount of planning needed to maintain daily operations and grow your business. Now, you may be ready for retirement. But, the planning does not end. What you do next, and how you navigate potential tax issues and regulatory pitfalls, can make a big difference in the long-term success of your retirement.

Here are some of the more “taxing” concerns you may face associated with retirement:

Early retirement and early withdrawals.

If you take withdrawals from your qualified retirement plan before age 59½, you may be subject to a 10% Federal income tax penalty. There are certain instances in which early withdrawals may be taken without penalty, such as death, disability, or substantially equal periodic payments. Otherwise, at 10%, the penalty tax can be significant, so it is important to plan accordingly.

Waiting too long. You must begin taking required minimum distributions (RMDs) from your traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA) by April 1 of the year after you reach age 70½. If you fail to do so or do not withdraw enough, you will be subject to a 50% penalty tax, which will be incurred on the difference between your RMD and the actual withdrawal amount. Your RMD amount is based on the previous December 31 balance, divided by your life expectancy (or the joint life expectancy of you and your spouse, if applicable).

Working while receiving Social Security.
If you receive Social Security and also continue to work, a portion of your benefits may be taxable. For more information, refer to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Publication 915, Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits, or consult with your tax professional.

You may be subject to the “give-back” if you are under full retirement age (based on the year of your birth), receive Social Security benefits, and earn income. The law requires a give-back of $1 for every $2 earned in excess of $17,040 in 2018 for those individuals between the ages of 62 and full retirement age who are receiving a reduced Social Security benefit.

For the year in which an individual attains full retirement age, the give-back is $1 for every $3 in excess of $45,360 for 2018. Starting in the month in which the individual attains full retirement age, the give-back is eliminated. If you are under full retirement age and thinking about taking Social Security benefits while still working, it is important to understand the potential tax consequences of doing so.

Where you live in retirement matters.
Each state has its own rules on income, estate, sales, and property taxation. Your tax and legal advisors can help you assess the potential tax advantages and disadvantages of your retirement destination.

Planning Continues through Retirement

Your personal retirement plan probably involved building a nest egg with regular savings over decades. Now that you are preparing for retirement, continue with your planning.

Tax Planning for Retirement – Roth Benefits

After years of saving and planning for their golden years, many people nearing retirement fail to consider the tax burden they may face on income they receive after they stop working. While you may see a reduction in the amount of taxes you owe after the age of 65, you still need to plan ahead if you want to minimize your tax bill from the IRS.  

Social Security Benefits

Depending upon your total income and marital status, a portion of your Social Security benefits may be taxable. For a rough estimate of your potential tax liability, add half of your Social Security benefits to your projected income from all other sources. This figure is your adjusted gross income (AGI), plus any tax-free interest income from municipal bonds or foreign-earned income. Up to half of Social Security benefits are taxable if this sum, which is called your provisional income, exceeds $25,000 for singles or $32,000 for married couples filing jointly. However, up to 85% of Social Security benefits are taxable if your provisional income is above $34,000 for single filers or $44,000 for married couples filing jointly.

Use the Social Security Benefits Worksheet in the instructions for IRS Form 1040 to calculate the exact amount of taxes owed. Rather than writing a large check once a year, you can arrange to have taxes withheld from your Social Security benefits checks by completing Form W-4V and filing it with the Social Security Administration.

Other Income Sources

In addition to collecting Social Security benefits, most retirees receive their income from a variety of sources, including distributions from 401(k) accounts and individual retirement accounts (IRAs); payouts from company pensions and annuities; and earnings from investments.

Contributions and earnings growth are tax deferred on 401(k)s and traditional IRAs; however, distributions from these accounts are fully taxable, but have no penalties if withdrawals are made after age 59½. If you have savings in 401(k) accounts or traditional IRAs, you must begin making withdrawals from these accounts—and paying taxes on the distributions—by April 1 of the year following the year in which you reach age 70½. If you are at least 59½ years old and have owned a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) for at least five years, withdrawals are completely tax free. There are no minimum distribution requirements for Roth accounts.

Strategies to Minimize Taxes

Most retirees with nest eggs or pension income of any size will pay at least some taxes on their retirement income, but there are strategies to reduce the amount owed. While it usually makes sense to delay taking taxable distributions from retirement accounts until the funds are needed, or until distributions are required, you may want to withdraw more funds in tax years when claiming a large number of deductions temporarily lowers your tax rate. You may, for example, choose to take advantage of itemized deductions, such as the breaks for medical expenses or charitable gifts, in certain years, while taking the standard deduction in other years.

A desire to leave a portion of your assets to your family may also influence how you handle withdrawals from tax-deferred accounts. Keep in mind that, if you leave behind funds in a traditional IRA, the rules for inheritance can be complex. To avoid these issues and make it easier to pass on your estate to family members, consider converting traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs. While you will have to pay taxes on the funds converted, moving to a Roth IRA eliminates future tax liabilities, regardless of whether you use the funds in retirement or pass the money on to your heirs.

How Bunching Expenses Can Enable Taxpayers to Continue to Itemize

In response to the significant changes to the tax deduction rules under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), many taxpayers are searching for ways to recover some of the tax benefits associated with itemizing deductible expenses that have been eliminated. Taxpayers who were previously able to lower their tax bills by itemizing may want to consider using a “bunching” strategy, which generally means either accelerating or deferring deductible expenses so that more of these expenses fall in a single tax year rather than in multiple tax years.

Helping Your Heirs While Helping Others via the Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT) #giving

Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT)

A charitable remainder trust (CRT) can be a highly effective financial and estate planning tool. The CRT can allow you to: avoid capital gains taxes on highly appreciated assets, however when income is distributed to the income beneficiaries it is taxable; receive an income stream based on the full, fair market value (FMV) of those assets; receive an immediate charitable deduction; and ultimately benefit the charity(ies) of your choice.

How Small Businesses Can Take Advantage of Tax Reform #TCJA

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017 created substantial new tax breaks for companies of all sizes, but owners of smaller businesses in particular may still be reviewing how much their tax burden could change under the new legislation. The deductions individual business owners can take advantage of and the value of these tax breaks will vary considerably depending on the nature of their business activities, their income levels, and other factors that they may be able to adjust to maximize their tax benefits.